Tumblr Themes

Photo Post Thu, Apr. 10, 2014 1 note

arxsec:

Cybersecurity: How to Kill the Heartbleed BugApril 9 (Bloomberg) –- HighQ Chief Strategy Officer Prateek Kathpal and Berkeley Varitronics Systems CEO Scott Schober discuss the Heartbleed bug …

Gonna discuss this issue

arxsec:

Cybersecurity: How to Kill the Heartbleed Bug

Gonna discuss this issue




Photo Post Thu, Apr. 10, 2014 1 note

arxsec:

THE FIRST SECRET TO HACKING EDUCATIONWhen I was in kindergarten, I took an IQ test. Wait too long, my parents were told, and you can’t accurately judge ‘native intellectual ability.’ So at 5 …

arxsec:

THE FIRST SECRET TO HACKING EDUCATION




Photo Post Sat, Apr. 05, 2014 93 notes

thenewenlightenmentage:

Flare Bursts From Sun
On Feb. 24, 2014, the sun emitted a significant solar flare, peaking at 7:49 p.m. EST. NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), which keeps a constant watch on the sun, captured images of the event. These SDO images from 7:25 p.m. EST on Feb. 24 show the first moments of this X-class flare in different wavelengths of light — seen as the bright spot that appears on the left limb of the sun. Hot solar material can be seen hovering above the active region in the sun’s atmosphere, the corona.
Solar flares are powerful bursts of radiation, appearing as giant flashes of light in the SDO images. Harmful radiation from a flare cannot pass through Earth’s atmosphere to physically affect humans on the ground, however — when intense enough — they can disturb the atmosphere in the layer where GPS and communications signals travel.
Image Credit: NASA/SDO

thenewenlightenmentage:

Flare Bursts From Sun

On Feb. 24, 2014, the sun emitted a significant solar flare, peaking at 7:49 p.m. EST. NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), which keeps a constant watch on the sun, captured images of the event. These SDO images from 7:25 p.m. EST on Feb. 24 show the first moments of this X-class flare in different wavelengths of light — seen as the bright spot that appears on the left limb of the sun. Hot solar material can be seen hovering above the active region in the sun’s atmosphere, the corona.

Solar flares are powerful bursts of radiation, appearing as giant flashes of light in the SDO images. Harmful radiation from a flare cannot pass through Earth’s atmosphere to physically affect humans on the ground, however — when intense enough — they can disturb the atmosphere in the layer where GPS and communications signals travel.

Image Credit: NASA/SDO

(Source: Wired)




Photo Post Sat, Apr. 05, 2014 100 notes

thenewenlightenmentage:

CERN Accelerator Provides Clues to Ages of Largest Explosions in the Universe
What happens inside a dying star? A recent experiment at CERN’s REX accelerator offers clues that could help astrophysicists to recalculate the ages of some of the largest explosions in the universe.Core-collapse supernovae are spectacular stellar explosions that can briefly outshine an entire galaxy. They occur when massive stars – stars that are more than eight times as massive as our sun – collapse upon themselves. Huge amounts of matter and energy are ejected into space during these events. The cores of such stars then rapidly collapse and go on to form a neutron star or a black hole.
The sequence of events in the first few seconds of a massive star collapsing is well understood. Elements in and around the core are broken down by high-energy photons into free protons, neutrons and alpha particles. Bursts of neutrinos follow. But modelling what happens next remains a challenge for astrophysicists.
Continue Reading

thenewenlightenmentage:

CERN Accelerator Provides Clues to Ages of Largest Explosions in the Universe

What happens inside a dying star? A recent experiment at CERN’s REX accelerator offers clues that could help astrophysicists to recalculate the ages of some of the largest explosions in the universe.Core-collapse supernovae are spectacular stellar explosions that can briefly outshine an entire galaxy. They occur when massive stars – stars that are more than eight times as massive as our sun – collapse upon themselves. Huge amounts of matter and energy are ejected into space during these events. The cores of such stars then rapidly collapse and go on to form a neutron star or a black hole.

The sequence of events in the first few seconds of a massive star collapsing is well understood. Elements in and around the core are broken down by high-energy photons into free protons, neutrons and alpha particles. Bursts of neutrinos follow. But modelling what happens next remains a challenge for astrophysicists.

Continue Reading




Photo Post Sat, Apr. 05, 2014 317 notes

thenewenlightenmentage:

How Many Dimensions Does the Universe Really Have?
An engineer, a mathematician and a physicist walk into a universe. How many dimensions do they find?
The engineer whips out a protractor and straightedge. That’s easy, she says. With her instruments she demonstrates the trio of directions at right angles to each other: length, width and height. “Three,” she reports.
The mathematician gets out his notepad and creates a list of regular, symmetric geometric shapes with perpendicular sides. Squares have four linear edges, he notes. Cubes have six square sides. By extrapolation, hypercubes have eight cubic sides. Continuing the pattern, he realizes that he could keep going forever. “Infinity,” he says.
Continue Reading

thenewenlightenmentage:

How Many Dimensions Does the Universe Really Have?

An engineer, a mathematician and a physicist walk into a universe. How many dimensions do they find?

The engineer whips out a protractor and straightedge. That’s easy, she says. With her instruments she demonstrates the trio of directions at right angles to each other: length, width and height. “Three,” she reports.

The mathematician gets out his notepad and creates a list of regular, symmetric geometric shapes with perpendicular sides. Squares have four linear edges, he notes. Cubes have six square sides. By extrapolation, hypercubes have eight cubic sides. Continuing the pattern, he realizes that he could keep going forever. “Infinity,” he says.

Continue Reading




Photo Post Fri, Apr. 04, 2014 28 notes

laboratoryequipment:

Nanoballoons, Lasers Team to Fight CancerChemotherapeutic drugs excel at fighting cancer, but they’re not so efficient at getting where they need to go. They often interact with blood, bone marrow and other healthy bodily systems. This dilutes the drugs and causes unwanted side effects.Now, researchers are developing a better delivery method by encapsulating the drugs in nanoballoons, tiny modified liposomes that — upon being struck by a red laser — pop open and deliver concentrated doses of medicine.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/nanoballoons-lasers-team-fight-cancer

laboratoryequipment:

Nanoballoons, Lasers Team to Fight Cancer

Chemotherapeutic drugs excel at fighting cancer, but they’re not so efficient at getting where they need to go. They often interact with blood, bone marrow and other healthy bodily systems. This dilutes the drugs and causes unwanted side effects.

Now, researchers are developing a better delivery method by encapsulating the drugs in nanoballoons, tiny modified liposomes that — upon being struck by a red laser — pop open and deliver concentrated doses of medicine.

Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/nanoballoons-lasers-team-fight-cancer




Video Post Fri, Apr. 04, 2014 127,631 notes

afternoonsnoozebutton:

cahlumhood:

the-enchanted-mermaid:

Meet the World’s Smallest Rabbit.

Columbia Basin Pygmy Rabbits are the world’s smallest and among the rarest. 

BUT THEY HAVE RAINBOW EARS

They add the color w/ chalk or something so they can tell them apart

(via laboratoryequipment)




Photo Post Sun, Mar. 30, 2014 353 notes

jewsee-medicalstudent:

The blood-air barrier.
This is a colorized scanning electron micrograph showing the erythrocytes (red blood cells) within the capillary network of an alveola. The blood–air barrier (alveolar–capillary barrier or membrane) exists to prevent air bubbles from forming in the blood, and from blood entering the alveoli. It is permeable to molecular oxygen, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide and many other gases and it is extremely thin (approximately 2μm) to allow sufficient oxygen diffusion, yet it is extremely strong. This strength comes from the type IV collagen in between the endothelial and epithelial cells. 
Failure of the barrier may occur in a pulmonary barotrauma. This can be a result of several possible causes, including blast injury, and breathing gas entrapment or retention in the lung during depressurization, which can occur during ascent from underwater diving or loss of pressure from a pressurized vehicle, habitat or pressure suit. A possible consequence of rupture of the blood–air barrier is arterial gas embolism.
(Picture by The Cell Image Library).

jewsee-medicalstudent:

The blood-air barrier.

This is a colorized scanning electron micrograph showing the erythrocytes (red blood cells) within the capillary network of an alveola. The blood–air barrier (alveolar–capillary barrier or membrane) exists to prevent air bubbles from forming in the blood, and from blood entering the alveoli. It is permeable to molecular oxygen, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide and many other gases and it is extremely thin (approximately 2μm) to allow sufficient oxygen diffusion, yet it is extremely strong. This strength comes from the type IV collagen in between the endothelial and epithelial cells.

Failure of the barrier may occur in a pulmonary barotrauma. This can be a result of several possible causes, including blast injury, and breathing gas entrapment or retention in the lung during depressurization, which can occur during ascent from underwater diving or loss of pressure from a pressurized vehicle, habitat or pressure suit. A possible consequence of rupture of the blood–air barrier is arterial gas embolism.

(Picture by The Cell Image Library).

(via currentsinbiology)




Photo Post Thu, Mar. 20, 2014 105 notes

thenewenlightenmentage:

How Do Astronomers Actually Find Exoplanets?
A handful of ingenious methods have been used to detect the planets too far away for us to see
A generation ago, the idea of a planet orbiting a distant star was still in the realm of science fiction. But since the discovery of the first exoplanet in 1988, we’ve found hundreds of them, with the discoveries coming at a faster rate over time.
Last month, in a single announcement, NASA astronomers revealed the discovery of 715 previously unknown planets in data collected by the Kepler Space Telescope, bringing the total number of known exoplanets to 1771. Within this are all sorts of exoplanets: some that orbit two stars, some that are full of water, some that are roughly Earth-sized and some that are more than twice as big as Jupiter.
Continue Reading

thenewenlightenmentage:

How Do Astronomers Actually Find Exoplanets?

A handful of ingenious methods have been used to detect the planets too far away for us to see

A generation ago, the idea of a planet orbiting a distant star was still in the realm of science fiction. But since the discovery of the first exoplanet in 1988, we’ve found hundreds of them, with the discoveries coming at a faster rate over time.

Last month, in a single announcement, NASA astronomers revealed the discovery of 715 previously unknown planets in data collected by the Kepler Space Telescope, bringing the total number of known exoplanets to 1771. Within this are all sorts of exoplanets: some that orbit two stars, some that are full of water, some that are roughly Earth-sized and some that are more than twice as big as Jupiter.

Continue Reading




Photo Post Thu, Mar. 20, 2014 105 notes

christinetheastrophysicist:

The First Joint Measurements of the Top Quark’s Mass
Scientists at the LHC and Tevatron colliders have combined their data to find a more percise measurement for the top quark’s mass, the most massive of all elementary particles. The four experiements involved was CERN’s ATLAS and CMS, and Fermilab’s CDF and DZERO. Together, they have arrived at a new value of 173.34 ± 0.76 GeV/c2. 
More information is available from the CERN press release located here. The joint technical paper can be found here.
Image: This error-bar graph shows the top quark masses published by the individual groups, along with the combined measurement (Source).


Really enjoyed this. Been interesting in quarks and the application of it for energy.

christinetheastrophysicist:

The First Joint Measurements of the Top Quark’s Mass

Scientists at the LHC and Tevatron colliders have combined their data to find a more percise measurement for the top quark’s mass, the most massive of all elementary particles. The four experiements involved was CERN’s ATLAS and CMS, and Fermilab’s CDF and DZERO. Together, they have arrived at a new value of 173.34 ± 0.76 GeV/c2

More information is available from the CERN press release located here. The joint technical paper can be found here.

Image: This error-bar graph shows the top quark masses published by the individual groups, along with the combined measurement (Source).

Really enjoyed this. Been interesting in quarks and the application of it for energy.

(via thenewenlightenmentage)



1/15 older »