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Photo Post Tue, Apr. 22, 2014 1,123 notes

coolmathstuff:

allofthemath:

appliedmathemagics:

themathkid:

Can’t. Stop. Watching.

this is hypnotic…

Conic sections are all connected! A hyperbola is an anti circle, in this case.

Remember, the equation for a circle involves adding x squared and y squared, while the equation for a hyperbola involves subtracting one from the other. The other consequence of this is that is that if you extend the graph of either one to include imaginary and complex x or y values, a hyperbola contains a circle in its empty space, and a circle has a hyperbola surrounding it.

coolmathstuff:

allofthemath:

appliedmathemagics:

themathkid:

Can’t. Stop. Watching.

this is hypnotic…

Conic sections are all connected! A hyperbola is an anti circle, in this case.

Remember, the equation for a circle involves adding x squared and y squared, while the equation for a hyperbola involves subtracting one from the other. The other consequence of this is that is that if you extend the graph of either one to include imaginary and complex x or y values, a hyperbola contains a circle in its empty space, and a circle has a hyperbola surrounding it.

(Source: jamiedykes, via centerofmath)




Photo Post Tue, Apr. 22, 2014 27 notes

laboratoryequipment:

Physicists Push Parkinson’s Treatment Toward TrialsThe most effective way to tackle debilitating diseases is to punch them at the start and keep them from growing.Research at Michigan State Univ., published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, shows that a small “molecular tweezer” keeps proteins from clumping, or aggregating, the first step of neurological disorders such as Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease and Huntington’s disease. The results are pushing the promising molecule toward clinical trials and actually becoming a new drug, says Lisa Lapidus, MSU associate professor of physics and astronomy and co-author of the paper.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/physicists-push-parkinson%E2%80%99s-treatment-toward-trials

laboratoryequipment:

Physicists Push Parkinson’s Treatment Toward Trials

The most effective way to tackle debilitating diseases is to punch them at the start and keep them from growing.

Research at Michigan State Univ., published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, shows that a small “molecular tweezer” keeps proteins from clumping, or aggregating, the first step of neurological disorders such as Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease and Huntington’s disease. The results are pushing the promising molecule toward clinical trials and actually becoming a new drug, says Lisa Lapidus, MSU associate professor of physics and astronomy and co-author of the paper.

Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/physicists-push-parkinson%E2%80%99s-treatment-toward-trials




Link Post Tue, Apr. 22, 2014 164 notes

A Simple View Of Gravity Does Not Fully Explain The Distribution Of Stars In Crowded Clusters

probablyasocialecologist:

Gravity remains the dominant force on large astronomical scales, but when it comes to stars in young star clusters the dynamics in these crowded environments cannot be simply explained by the pull of gravity.

image

Hubble Space Telescope image of the young star cluster NGC 1818 in the Large Magellanic Cloud. KIAA researchers found to their surprise an increasing fraction of binary systems as they looked at increasingly larger distances from the cluster center, as illustrated graphically in the inset. Image: Peking University

After analyzing Hubble Space Telescope images of star cluster NGC 1818 in the Large Magellanic Cloud, a satellite galaxy of the Milky Way, researchers at the Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics (KIAA) at Peking University in Beijing found more binary star systems toward the periphery of cluster than in the center – the opposite of what they expected. The surprising distribution of binaries is thought to result from complex interactions among stars within young clusters.

The team’s finding will be published in the March 1 print issue of The Astrophysical Journal and is now online.

In the dynamic environment of a star cluster, high-mass stars are thought to gravitate toward the center of a cluster when they give a ‘kick’ to lower-mass stars and lose energy, explained KIAA Prof. Richard de Grijs, who led the study. This leads them to sink to the cluster center, while the lower-mass stars gain energy and might move to orbits at greater distances from the cluster core. Astronomers call this process “mass segregation.

However, when the Kavli researchers looked closely at binary star systems within NGC 1818, they found a much more complex picture.

Most stars in clusters actually form in pairs, called binary stars,” which initially are located so close to one another that they interact, resulting in the destruction of some binary systems. Other binaries, meanwhile, swap partners. Astronomers had expected that the same process that leads a cluster’s most massive stars to gravitate toward the center would also apply to binaries. This is because together, the stars that make up binaries have more mass on average than a single star.

When the astronomers discovered that there were more binaries the farther from the core they observed, they were initially baffled by this unexpected result. They concluded that so-called “soft” binary systems, in which the two stars orbit each other at rather large distances, are destroyed due to close encounters with other stars near the cluster’s center. Meanwhile, “hard” binaries, in which the two stars orbit one another at much shorter distances, survive close encounters with other stars much better, all throughout a cluster. This is why more binaries were seen farther out than close in.

Mapping the radial distribution of binary systems in dense star clusters had never been done before for clusters as young as NGC 1818, which is thought to be 15-30 million years old. This is difficult to do in any case, because there are no young clusters nearby in our own Milky Way galaxy. The new result provides new insights into theoretically predicted processes that govern the evolution of star clusters.

“The extremely dynamic interactions among stars in clusters complicates our understanding of gravity,” team member Chengyuan Li said. “One needs to investigate the entire physical environment to fully understand what’s happening in that environment. Things are usually more complex than they appear.”

Source

(via pinkiepieaddict)




Photo Post Thu, Apr. 10, 2014 1 note

arxsec:

Cybersecurity: How to Kill the Heartbleed BugApril 9 (Bloomberg) –- HighQ Chief Strategy Officer Prateek Kathpal and Berkeley Varitronics Systems CEO Scott Schober discuss the Heartbleed bug …

Gonna discuss this issue

arxsec:

Cybersecurity: How to Kill the Heartbleed Bug

Gonna discuss this issue




Photo Post Thu, Apr. 10, 2014 1 note

arxsec:

THE FIRST SECRET TO HACKING EDUCATIONWhen I was in kindergarten, I took an IQ test. Wait too long, my parents were told, and you can’t accurately judge ‘native intellectual ability.’ So at 5 …

arxsec:

THE FIRST SECRET TO HACKING EDUCATION




Photo Post Sat, Apr. 05, 2014 93 notes

thenewenlightenmentage:

Flare Bursts From Sun
On Feb. 24, 2014, the sun emitted a significant solar flare, peaking at 7:49 p.m. EST. NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), which keeps a constant watch on the sun, captured images of the event. These SDO images from 7:25 p.m. EST on Feb. 24 show the first moments of this X-class flare in different wavelengths of light — seen as the bright spot that appears on the left limb of the sun. Hot solar material can be seen hovering above the active region in the sun’s atmosphere, the corona.
Solar flares are powerful bursts of radiation, appearing as giant flashes of light in the SDO images. Harmful radiation from a flare cannot pass through Earth’s atmosphere to physically affect humans on the ground, however — when intense enough — they can disturb the atmosphere in the layer where GPS and communications signals travel.
Image Credit: NASA/SDO

thenewenlightenmentage:

Flare Bursts From Sun

On Feb. 24, 2014, the sun emitted a significant solar flare, peaking at 7:49 p.m. EST. NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), which keeps a constant watch on the sun, captured images of the event. These SDO images from 7:25 p.m. EST on Feb. 24 show the first moments of this X-class flare in different wavelengths of light — seen as the bright spot that appears on the left limb of the sun. Hot solar material can be seen hovering above the active region in the sun’s atmosphere, the corona.

Solar flares are powerful bursts of radiation, appearing as giant flashes of light in the SDO images. Harmful radiation from a flare cannot pass through Earth’s atmosphere to physically affect humans on the ground, however — when intense enough — they can disturb the atmosphere in the layer where GPS and communications signals travel.

Image Credit: NASA/SDO

(Source: Wired)




Photo Post Sat, Apr. 05, 2014 102 notes

thenewenlightenmentage:

CERN Accelerator Provides Clues to Ages of Largest Explosions in the Universe
What happens inside a dying star? A recent experiment at CERN’s REX accelerator offers clues that could help astrophysicists to recalculate the ages of some of the largest explosions in the universe.Core-collapse supernovae are spectacular stellar explosions that can briefly outshine an entire galaxy. They occur when massive stars – stars that are more than eight times as massive as our sun – collapse upon themselves. Huge amounts of matter and energy are ejected into space during these events. The cores of such stars then rapidly collapse and go on to form a neutron star or a black hole.
The sequence of events in the first few seconds of a massive star collapsing is well understood. Elements in and around the core are broken down by high-energy photons into free protons, neutrons and alpha particles. Bursts of neutrinos follow. But modelling what happens next remains a challenge for astrophysicists.
Continue Reading

thenewenlightenmentage:

CERN Accelerator Provides Clues to Ages of Largest Explosions in the Universe

What happens inside a dying star? A recent experiment at CERN’s REX accelerator offers clues that could help astrophysicists to recalculate the ages of some of the largest explosions in the universe.Core-collapse supernovae are spectacular stellar explosions that can briefly outshine an entire galaxy. They occur when massive stars – stars that are more than eight times as massive as our sun – collapse upon themselves. Huge amounts of matter and energy are ejected into space during these events. The cores of such stars then rapidly collapse and go on to form a neutron star or a black hole.

The sequence of events in the first few seconds of a massive star collapsing is well understood. Elements in and around the core are broken down by high-energy photons into free protons, neutrons and alpha particles. Bursts of neutrinos follow. But modelling what happens next remains a challenge for astrophysicists.

Continue Reading




Photo Post Sat, Apr. 05, 2014 470 notes

thenewenlightenmentage:

How Many Dimensions Does the Universe Really Have?
An engineer, a mathematician and a physicist walk into a universe. How many dimensions do they find?
The engineer whips out a protractor and straightedge. That’s easy, she says. With her instruments she demonstrates the trio of directions at right angles to each other: length, width and height. “Three,” she reports.
The mathematician gets out his notepad and creates a list of regular, symmetric geometric shapes with perpendicular sides. Squares have four linear edges, he notes. Cubes have six square sides. By extrapolation, hypercubes have eight cubic sides. Continuing the pattern, he realizes that he could keep going forever. “Infinity,” he says.
Continue Reading

thenewenlightenmentage:

How Many Dimensions Does the Universe Really Have?

An engineer, a mathematician and a physicist walk into a universe. How many dimensions do they find?

The engineer whips out a protractor and straightedge. That’s easy, she says. With her instruments she demonstrates the trio of directions at right angles to each other: length, width and height. “Three,” she reports.

The mathematician gets out his notepad and creates a list of regular, symmetric geometric shapes with perpendicular sides. Squares have four linear edges, he notes. Cubes have six square sides. By extrapolation, hypercubes have eight cubic sides. Continuing the pattern, he realizes that he could keep going forever. “Infinity,” he says.

Continue Reading




Photo Post Fri, Apr. 04, 2014 28 notes

laboratoryequipment:

Nanoballoons, Lasers Team to Fight CancerChemotherapeutic drugs excel at fighting cancer, but they’re not so efficient at getting where they need to go. They often interact with blood, bone marrow and other healthy bodily systems. This dilutes the drugs and causes unwanted side effects.Now, researchers are developing a better delivery method by encapsulating the drugs in nanoballoons, tiny modified liposomes that — upon being struck by a red laser — pop open and deliver concentrated doses of medicine.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/nanoballoons-lasers-team-fight-cancer

laboratoryequipment:

Nanoballoons, Lasers Team to Fight Cancer

Chemotherapeutic drugs excel at fighting cancer, but they’re not so efficient at getting where they need to go. They often interact with blood, bone marrow and other healthy bodily systems. This dilutes the drugs and causes unwanted side effects.

Now, researchers are developing a better delivery method by encapsulating the drugs in nanoballoons, tiny modified liposomes that — upon being struck by a red laser — pop open and deliver concentrated doses of medicine.

Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/nanoballoons-lasers-team-fight-cancer




Video Post Fri, Apr. 04, 2014 129,712 notes

afternoonsnoozebutton:

cahlumhood:

the-enchanted-mermaid:

Meet the World’s Smallest Rabbit.

Columbia Basin Pygmy Rabbits are the world’s smallest and among the rarest. 

BUT THEY HAVE RAINBOW EARS

They add the color w/ chalk or something so they can tell them apart

(via laboratoryequipment)



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